CasinoCityTimes.com

Gurus
News
Newsletter
Author Home Author Archives Author Books Send to a Friend Search Articles Subscribe
Stay informed with the
NEW Casino City Times newsletter!
Newsletter Signup
Stay informed with the
NEW Casino City Times newsletter!
Recent Articles
Best of John Robison

Gaming Guru

author's picture
 

Machine advice: Pennies or nickels?

23 June 2008

Hi,

I know you have answered questions like this, in various ways, but I am still a little confused about payouts and payback percentages on multi-denomination machines, so I will list a specific example. My favorite slot, at the casinos, is Texas Tea. As you know, you are able to choose from a variety of denominations, usually 1 cent, 2 cents, 5 cents, 10 cents and 25 cents. If memory serves me correctly, most of the Texas Tea games I've played have a max line/max credit bet, at the penny amount, of either 180 or 250 credits (in other words, each max bet play costs $1.80 or $2.50, depending on the machine). Regardless of whether I choose a 180 credit machine or a 250 credit one, I believe the max credits on both machines, at the nickel level, is 45, which would be $2.25 a play. I've never played this particular game at any higher denom., so I couldn't tell you what max credits are for dime or quarter play.

My question is, if what you say is true, that casino owners can set the payback percentage at different amounts, based on denomination (i.e. higher for higher denominations), would it be more beneficial for me to play at a higher denomination, since the payback percentage may be higher, but the cost to me, for a max bet, may not be that much more than that for betting at penny level (and may even cost less, as in the example of the 250 credit machine)? I usually play at the penny level, but on my last trip to Vegas, I noticed this situation, and noted to myself that I may actually be doing myself in, by playing the penny denomination. Either way, I'm not likely to cease playing, as I get an incredible amount of enjoyment out of the game, even when losing, and, because the bonus rounds pop up so frequently, I can keep going for a very long time on a rather small investment.

Thank you,
Angela

Dear Angela,

I think you're better off playing $2.25 a spin on a nickel machine than $2.50 per spin on a penny machine.

Two reasons. First, you're risking less per spin. Second, nickel machines usually have higher long-term paybacks than penny machines.

Best of luck in and out of the casinos,
John


Send your slot and video poker questions to John Robison, Slot Expert, at slotexpert@comcast.net. Because of the volume of mail I receive, I regret that I can't reply to every question.

John Robison

John Robison is an expert on slot machines and how to play them. John is a slot and video poker columnist and has written for many of gaming’s leading publications. He holds a master's degree in computer science from the prestigious Stevens Institute of Technology.

You may hear John give his slot and video poker tips live on The Good Times Show, hosted by Rudi Schiffer and Mike Schiffer, which is broadcast from Memphis on KXIQ 1180AM Friday afternoon from from 2PM to 5PM Central Time. John is on the show from 4:30 to 5. You can listen to archives of the show on the web anytime.

Books by John Robison:

The Slot Expert's Guide to Playing Slots
John Robison
John Robison is an expert on slot machines and how to play them. John is a slot and video poker columnist and has written for many of gaming’s leading publications. He holds a master's degree in computer science from the prestigious Stevens Institute of Technology.

You may hear John give his slot and video poker tips live on The Good Times Show, hosted by Rudi Schiffer and Mike Schiffer, which is broadcast from Memphis on KXIQ 1180AM Friday afternoon from from 2PM to 5PM Central Time. John is on the show from 4:30 to 5. You can listen to archives of the show on the web anytime.

Books by John Robison:

The Slot Expert's Guide to Playing Slots